and Moccasin Trail

See the source imageIt is a long book.  I have about five more chapters to go.  It is about a Third Culture Kid named Jim.  He is a white boy who was adopted by a Crow (Native American) tribe.  This book is about his quest to find out who he is and where he belongs.

My husband read it out loud to my children and my children loved it.  Somehow, they were able to identify with Jim, the main character.  They read several pages each night as part of our bedtime routine read-a-good-book-aloud tradition; so once they were all done, I decided to read it for myself.  It has been difficult to put it down.  I can also identify with Jim.

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and Making Friends in the South

Time flies!  We have been here a little over two years!  You may think we are past the transition, but the two year mark has hit harder on me than the first year mark.  I was on survival mode for the first year, searching for the basic necessities of life.  Do we have a place to live?  Check.  Transportation?  Check.  Schools?  Check.  Church?  Check.  Grocery store?  Bank?  Check.  Pediatrician?  Check. Walmart?  Target?  Check.  Friends?  Hmmm….  A few. Continue reading

and Local Panhandlers

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My daughter´s transition bridge filled a weeks after we returned to the US.

Happy New Year!  I have to get in my January post!  I thought that perhaps after a little over a year of living in the US, I would be completely adjusted.  I’m not. My oldest daughter seems to be the most settled of us all.  My younger two continue to express their desire to return to Honduras.  And even though we have found out, more so, where we fit in our community, there are still things that perplex me about this place.  Things that I find hard to understand, for example, beggars in my town. Continue reading

and Church Search

Or… church shopping?  It does feel a bit like shopping, to tell you the truth.  And just like grocery shopping, where there are far too many options, it can tire you out.  And if you are an introvert, it can tire you out even more.  So what should you do?  How do you find a place of worship?

If you are coming “home” from working cross-culturally to the same city or town you left from, you may already have a home church waiting for your return.  They may be excited to have you back – that is, if you were very actively involved before.  If you were not actively involved before you left, then don’t be surprised if you are welcomed with something along the following lines: Continue reading

and Reverse Culture-Shock

Sometime after Thanksgiving 1984, after almost 3 years of living in Boulder, CO, we left for home (Read 6 Ways We Were Welcomed to the USA.) Four kids under the age of 10 were loaded in the back of a blue Subaru station wagon with most of our possessions in the cartop carrier.  We were driving 2,865 miles back to our house, our family, our home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.  We stayed a night or two in Houston, crossed the border to Mexico, stayed in a few hotels along the way and made it to Mexico City by Christmas.  We spent an unforgettable Christmas with Honduran friends, had the best flan I can ever remember tasting.   Continue reading