and Tortillas de Harina

Unfortunately, for the longest time, I had believed the myth that a Honduran woman had to have special hands to be able to make flour tortillas.  And since I grew up in the south-central region of Honduras, I never learned to make flour tortillas.  When I moved up north, I was told by a northern-coastal lady:  “You are not a real  Honduran woman if you do not know how to make flour tortillas.”  But in the seven years of living in the north coast, I never really learned how to make flour tortillas; therefore, I never really felt like I was a true Honduran woman.

But…  I moved back to the United States of America and I HAVE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE FLOUR TORTILLAS!!!!!!  ¡Eso!  One of my dear American friends provided me with the best flour tortilla recipe ever!  Here it is: Continue reading

and Our Kids’ Goodbye Parties

Even though kids can be very resilient and are quite adaptable, it can still be very hard for them to part with friends.  This is why we decided to allow each child to wrap up their time in Honduras by giving them the opportunity to say goodbye to special people in their lives in their own unique way.  They were able to choose (1) who they wanted to invite to their party and (2) what type of party they wanted to have.

Each party was different; but they did have a few things in common:

  1. They were all very simple.  Since the purpose of each party was to spend a memorable time with friends -and I’m not a very good party decorator-, we went “all natural” with the decoration.  We used what we had and spent money mostly on food, disposable plates, forks, napkins, etc.
  2. There were blank note cards and markers for guests to write a special message to the parting child.  If the guest was a child who could not write, I asked the child’s parent to write for them.  We loved collecting the notes at the end of the party and reading the special messages from friends.

Below you will find a picture and brief description of each of the three parties we had: Continue reading

and The Microwave

It was a little over six month before we moved back to the USA that our microwave stopped working due to the frequent power outages in our rural area of Honduras.   The timing was just right, though.  We were too close to our departure to purchase another one.  Having a gas range oven for re-heating food helped when the power was out, too.  And even though I missed the microwave initially; I learned to survive without it.  Here is how I survived: Continue reading